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When DVDs first became popular, I borrowed the entire output of an entire TV series that I never had the chance to watch when it was on television.

At the time, I said that would be the future of watching television.

Oh those simpler, more naïve times of the early 2000s.

Now, I would argue that watching television series on DVD is among the most inconvenient ways of watching programming.

However, at the time, it was a revelation. No commercials. Watch when you want. Binge watching — before that term came into prominence.

Of course, that all changed over the next couple of years when I got my first DVR.

I remember being in the cable company office, seeing the flyers for the DVR and asking the clerk, “Is this like the Tivo?” She said it was and explained how it worked.

My only question was, “How soon can I get one?”

Of all those exponential technological leaps of the early part of this century, the DVR seems to be the one that has stuck more or less in the same setup as when it was introduced.

I remember hearing it described thusly, “They said the Tivo (DVR) will change the way you watch TV. No, the Tivo (DVR) will change your life.”

And it has.

Now, when someone asks me if I have seen a certain commercial, often I say that I haven’t. I often go days without seeing any commercials.

Between fast forwarding through commercials, thus saving time, and the ability to time shift, I have no clue what network a lot of my shows are on or even what day and time they are on. When they show up in the DVR queue, I watch them.

It truly is remarkable, and for a kid of the 80s who remembers having to adjust the “rabbit ears” and having to get up off the couch to change the channel, it is both fascinating and mind-blowing that there is so much convenience with watching the shows I want to watch now.

When I have events planned for the evening during the week, I never even worry about what I might miss on television. Does anybody else remember having to set up the VCR and making sure you weren’t recording over something more important?

However, with the advent of streaming services and the ability to watch television shows on computers, tablets and phones, you don’t even need a DVR now.

It is just absolutely unreal to me the amount of content that is available online.

If I want to watch old wrestling programs, I have the WWE Network and YouTube, which can I watch on just about any device; I can do the same with Netflix or any number of streaming services.

No longer do I just have to listen to music when I am the treadmill.

Lately, when I have been on the treadmill, I have been watching “Breaking Bad” on Netflix. The last time we upgraded phones in our household, I went with a larger screen just for the purpose of being able to watch Netflix and WWE Network on it.

Now, if I want to watch something on my phone, I can plug in my headphones and not even leave the room if Mrs. Hanson is watching something on the television. I can’t be the only one who had a fight with siblings over the only television in the house or who lamented that television for the night was ruined if the President was giving a speech.

We truly do live in a wonderful time where watching anything we want is as convenient as possible.

I am going to jinx it (because I am excited to see what the future holds) and say it can’t possibly get any better.

Can it?

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